Using software to make your employees happier

There’s a lot of talk about how Service Management Software leads to more satisfied customers. We’ve even talked about this ourselves. And, there’s no doubt that when it comes to making your customers smile, the right software delivers a huge range of benefits. But there is another people-focused benefit to deploying a SaaS based integrated Service Manager Solution – and that’s happy employees.

You can forget about Pizza Friday or lunchtime bonding activities; because according to a report[1], what really boosts employee satisfaction is the use of SaaS at work. In fact, the study found that 74% of staff whose companies invest in SaaS expressed happiness at work compared to just 19% on non-SaaS users. And here’s why:

Employees are as frustrated with unproductive working practices as you are

While some bosses like to complain about engineers taking too long on the road, or extended tea-breaks, in reality, employees are often wasting valuable hours through no fault of their own. And they are as just as likely to be as frustrated by this as the people in charge.

The stats back this up, with the same report finding that the more SaaS was used, the more productive employees felt. In fact, while 70% of non-SaaS users reported feeling productive, this shot up to a whopping 96% of power users. So, an employee who ends their day knowing they have been productive is likely to be a lot happier than one that hasn’t been given the tools they need to do their job properly.

SaaS provides employees with extra freedom

According to the report, just 59% of non-SaaS users said they had a good work-life balance compared to 85% of power users. Of course, for anyone who has already made the leap to an integrated Service Manger solution these figures are unlikely to come as a surprise.

Changing attitudes and new technologies are shaking up the traditional working environment. Today, fewer people sit at their desks 9-5 than ever before; with mobile working now more important to 67% of staff than a company car[2].

With SaaS helping to cultivate new working patterns, the more it is used, the greater choice employees have about how and where they get their jobs done; and the happier they will be.

SaaS helps to foster trusted relationships

Even where the technology is available, some employers are reluctant to use it for fear of giving staff too much freedom. But, reports have found that employees who feel trusted have a greater sense of responsibility and give a better performance.

Of course, some roles require set hours and an on-site presence. But where flexible working practices can be accommodated, employees rise to the challenge. So you benefit from increased performance and morale.

SaaS helps to reduce the burden of “boring” work

Most employees become frustrated with paperwork. However, with compliance more important than ever, putting this off just isn’t an option.

With SaaS, you’ll benefit from the simplification, standardisation, and streamlining of business process and regulatory compliance. For example, because everything is available via the cloud, your engineers can fill in automated forms using any mobile device. This information then automatically syncs with your back office systems, in real-time. So, managers spend less time chasing teams to keep their paperwork up-to-date, and employees spend less time on admin and more on tasks they enjoy (and which make money!).

SaaS helps to reduce customer complaints

With SaaS, jobs are responded to more swiftly, problems are identified sooner, and communication between support staff and engineers is enhanced. With better customer service all round, your employees spend less time dealing with complaints – and that can only lead to a happier workforce at the end of each day!

 

To find out more about how we can help your employees to become more productive and fulfilled, speak to a member of our team on 01942 261 671 or email info@servicegeeni.com to find out more.

 

[1] Softchoice and the Blackstone Group

[2] BT, The Mobile Multiplier, 2016